Toxicity testing part 1

DNA adducts test

A new blood test offered by a company based in Devon, called Acumen, measures what chemicals are stuck on your DNA (it’s called a DNA Adducts test) and costs just £95. A whole host of chemicals are able to stick to your DNA which changes the DNA’s structure and cause faulty DNA replication, faulty DNA repair, DNA mutations and possibly leads to the development of cancerous cells. DNA adducts can include organic chemicals and heavy metals such as lipid peroxides, halogenated phenols from antiseptics, halogenated benzenes from insecticides, fungal toxins, pesticides, timber preservatives, ant killer, solvents, plastics and plasticisers and resins from composite timbers as well as cadmium, lead, arsenic and mercury.

This test has the potential to provide ground breaking information not only in cancer development but also in other areas of health and wellness. For example certain adducts could be activating or blocking various genes that can have a huge range of metabolic effects ranging from thyroid issues, weight management and many autoimmune diseases.

Once you know what is adducted to your DNA you can reduce your expose to that chemical, target the detoxification of that chemical to protect your DNA and retest to measure your progress.

This test would be indicated if:

  • You have ever had cancer or have a family history of cancer.
  • If you have ever smoked.
  • If you have been in contact with carcinogenic substances or environmental pollutants at work or at home (nail salons, dental mercury, paint fumes, industrial chemicals etc…).
  • If you want to identify factors that may be undermining your health.
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Winter season supplements part 1

Vitamin D

If you live north of 40-degree latitude (i.e. anywhere in the UK) the suns ultraviolet light is not strong enough to synthesise vitamin D in the skin during the winter. As people tend to get more colds and flu in the winter months there may be a correlation with vitamin D deficiency. The Canadian government are now looking at vitamin D as protection against swine flu. A 25(OH)D test costs about £40 and is a cheap functional marker of immune health. If you have low levels of vitamin D supplement with vitamin D3. E-mail me to find out how to boost your vitamin D levels.

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Research/Canada-examines-vitamin-D-for-swine-flu-protection

Vitamin D is also extremely important for bone health, neurological health weight loss and autoimmune disorders. Unless you get a lot of exposure to sunlight or eat lots of oily fish chances are you are vitamin D deficient. To find out how you can boost your vitamin D seek a nutritional therapy consultation with Steve Hines.

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8 Skin Moisturizer Ingredients You’d Best Avoid

Read this from Dr Mercola =>

http://www.mercolahealthyskin.com  

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What do you think of soy?

Read this from the Western A Price Foundation published on Dr Mercola’s website…

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/12/04/soy-dangers-summarized.aspx

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Reducing hamstring injuries in Footballers

Functional movement screening for injury prevention / performance enhancement are popular in sport. However, the validity of these movement screens remains to be thoroughly investigated. However, correcting these muscle imbalance in athletes clearly reduces injury and improves performance. Of 462 elite football players tested in the preseason, 53% were considered to be balanced, 47% were found to be imbalanced (in terms of quads and hamstrings ratios).



Strength imbalances
• 40% of players had bilateral differences on concentric strength.
• 60% of players had bilateral differences in eccentric strength.
• 87% of players had poor hamstring to quads ratio.

Injury frequency
• 4.1% of players with no pre-season strength imbalance sustained a hamstring injury.
• 16.5% of players with an untreated pre-season strength imbalance sustained a hamstring injury (a 4-fold increase in risk).
• 5.7% of players with a pre-season strength imbalance provided a programme to correct imbalances suffered a hamstring injury (significantly reduced risk) (Croisier, 2008)


Askling (2003) studied 90 elite Swedish football players and divided them in to 2 groups. Group 1 received no additional strength training, group 2 received 16 sessions of specific hamstring training, once every 5 days for 4 weeks, then once every 4 days for 6 weeks. Training consisted of 4 sets of 8 prone leg curls on a Yo-Yo device (concentric / eccentric action).


The prone leg curl group showed a significant increase in both concentric and eccentric strength compared to the control group; a significant increase in 30m speed and a significantly lower number of hamstring injuries

Arnason (2008) introduced a 5 weeks period of gradually increased training load, after this players performed 3 sets of Nordic hamstring eccentric exercises (one at 12 reps, one at 10 reps and one at 8 reps) – much like a glute ham raise. Teams were asked to use these exercises three times a week in the preseason and once to twice a week in season.


Hamstring injuries were 65% lower in teams that performed the eccentric exercise programme. In contrast stretching during warm up and flexibility training of the hamstrings had no effect on the incidence of hamstring strains.


Clearly doing hamstring strength training is required to prevent hamstring injuries. The best place to perform a high volume of hamstring training is in the preseason period for up to 6 weeks. A good GPP hamstring strength phase follows that can be used in the preseason period. This type of programme can also be used with injured players during their rehabilitation to prevent hamstring injuries when back in training. You will see that this programme emphasises the hip extensor component of the hamstring, integrating them with the glutes and low back. You could of course pick knee flexion exercises and perform a similar circuit. This is known as a Milos circuit after the body builder Milos Sarcev who has popularised this type of circuit. You should perform this circuit once every five days and build up to 4 sets. Enjoy

Posterior chain

Sets

Reps

Tempo

Rest

A1. Snatch grip DL

4

10

4010

10 seconds

A2. Reverse hyper

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A3. Incline hyper snatch grip reach and pull

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A4. Back extension

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A5. Seated good morning

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A6. Romanian dead lift

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A7. Standing good morning

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A8. Snatch grip Romanian dead lift

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A9. Pierre Roy squat

4

10

2010

10 seconds

A10. Straight knee round back DL

4

10

2010

180 seconds

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You go to the gym, but you’re still fat, here’s what you need to do…

1. You need to train at least 3-4 times a week. Sorry, but training once a week will do very little for you, twice a week is better and you will get some results but from working with athletes and regular gym goers over the last few years i can tell you that you will get the best results in terms of weight loss and muscle gain from training 3, preferably 4 times a week.

2. After you have completed your warm up, train for no longer than 1 hour at each training session. Once you are in the gym focus on what you are doing. If you are in the gym longer than an hour you are either socialising – thus won’t be working hard enough to get results, or you are training for too long which will cause a decrease in testosterone and an increase in cortisol to the point that you will not get the desired results from your workout.

3. Change your workout every 3-4 weeks. This works especially well if you are training 3-4 times a week. Your body is especially good at adapting to the demands imposed upon it and you will eventually get diminishing return on your investment. Your body need a constant change in stimulus to get results.

4. Every work out try to go a little heavier / harder on each set of each exercise you perform. This is where micro loading devices such as plate mates and Eleiko micro plates are especially useful and you can go from 10kg to 10.25kg, to 10.5kg etc… on an exercise instead of the usual 2-2.5kg jump in dumbbells or plates which often make increasing your loads impossible. Even trying to increase the reps per workout will be of benefit, for example if you have a reps / sets range of 5 x 4-6 for a given exercise and you perform the following:

• Set 1 – 6 reps
• Set 2 – 6 reps
• Set 3 – 5 reps
• Set 4 – 4 reps
• Set 5 – 4 reps
Then the next work out you should shoot for:
• Set 1 – 6 reps
• Set 2 – 6 reps
• Set 3 – 6 reps
• Set 4 – 5 reps
• Set 5 – 4 reps

5. As a rule of thumb, when you change your programmes every 3 weeks or so you should alternate between phases of trying to build muscle with phases of trying to build strength. For building muscle you would use higher reps and fewer sets, slower tempos and more exercises per body part. For strength you would use lower reps and more sets, faster tempos and fewer exercises per body part.

6. You need to lift weights! Yes even you girls need to do weight training; this will not turn you in to Arnold Schwarzenegger. Weight lifting builds muscle tissue and muscle is your friend. It makes you more sensitive to insulin (which is good) and gives you more metabolically active tissue that can burn fat 24/7. Go in to any gym in the world and you will see the lean and strong people in the weight training section.

7. Do not do steady state cardio. Conversely to the above point above, go into any gym in the world and you will see most of the fat unfit people plodding along on the treadmill watching the TV or pottering along on the rowing machine while chatting with a friend.. If you can watch the TV or read whilst you are training you are wasting your time, you will not get any results, you do not belong in the gym and should go home and park your fat arse on your sofa and watch TV or read there!

8. Instead of steady state cardio try a bout of interval training. This is a different kettle of fish; this is great for increasing post work out EPOC and for raising your metabolism. If you are doing intervals you should be training to the point of nausea, try reading a magazine when you want to puke!

9. Core training is BS! The research is clear on this; training on unstable devices does not activate your “core” any greater than exercising on the floor. What you need to realise is the results of these studies that show greater activation of core muscle whilst training on unstable devices demonstrate levels of muscle activity of less than 50% maximum contraction. The best exercises that create large activation in abdominal muscles are squats, dead lifts and chin ups! Of course if you add in some Swiss ball exercises at the end of your workout for fun / variety – go for it but make proper weight training the focus of your session.

10. Focus and attention to detail. When you are in the gym – train! No socialising, watching the fit birds on the cross training or watching the TV. Take a stop watch to the gym with you and when your rest period is up – get on with the next set. Pay attention to the reps, sets and tempo of the exercises you are performing. Write down what weights you used and how many sets and reps you did – next work out better it.

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